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pull request commentgithubtraining/continuous-delivery

Update 01_label-trigger.md

cc @mattdavis0351 for comms duty 👀

heckerdj

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pull request commentgithubtraining/continuous-delivery

Update 03_workflow-steps.md

cc @mattdavis0351 for comms duty 👀

yuyokk

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pull request commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

Great, thank you @crichID! I think I should be able to get to this on Tuesday of next week. 👍

brianamarie

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pull request commentheckerdj/github-actions-continuous-delivery

Create a staging workflow

Great catch, thank you @heckerdj! If you'd like to open a pull request, this content is open source. You can find the repository here, and here's a link to the specific file. Or, if you'd rather, let me know and we'll get right on it. 😊

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Briana Swift

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draft of git add content

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draft for git clone

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add git remote -v term to git overview

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draft of git pull guide

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start git remote page

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draft of git init

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remove metadata for git init

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refine git init

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refine git pull

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pull request commentgithub/training-kit

Add more general Git and GitHub

Thank you @DylanAStark! I'm going to push up some changes soon with drafts for these other commands. One of them will reference an image. This image is just a draft, but it's something that would be handy in at least one of these guides.

image

brianamarie

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pull request commentgithubtraining/security

Update instructions for configuring a GitHub Pages source

Hmm @parkerbxyz I'm not sure why the deploy is failing. @JasonEtco where can we look to get some more context on why this is failing? Could it be because it's a draft PR?

@parkerbxyz I think it's OK to try this as a non-draft PR to see if that affects the deploy. What do you think?

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James M. Greene

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Add recipe for Zucchini Stuffing

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Merge pull request #18 from JamesMGreene/patch-1 Add recipe for Zucchini Stuffing

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PR merged brianamarie/recipes

Add recipe for Zucchini Stuffing

It's amazing. 😱 😋

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pull request commentbrianamarie/recipes

Add recipe for Zucchini Stuffing

@JamesMGreene 😲 This looks DELICIOUS!!! Thank you!!!

PS Can Thanksgiving please come in January because I want to make this now

JamesMGreene

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delete branch brianamarie/writing-javascript-actions

delete branch : action-3

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add new create-issue step to workflow

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initial issue maker action dependencies

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writing action for opening joke issue

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adding js file for joke opening issue

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fix typo

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Merge pull request #8 from brianamarie/action-3 Use Outputs

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PR merged brianamarie/writing-javascript-actions

Use Outputs documentation enhancement
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writing action for opening joke issue

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Briana Swift

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initial issue maker action dependencies

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谭九鼎

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Chore: use https (#722) * Chore: use https * Update footer.html * update * Delete a space

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PR merged github/training-kit

Chore: use https

You can squash this

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imba-tjd

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pull request commentgithub/training-kit

Chore: use https

Thank you so much, @imba-tjd!

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translate up to "branches" section

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complete version 1.0

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typo

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add link to the translated resource

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fix: wordings, spelling errors Slightly improved readability

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Merge pull request #721 from Maharramoff/Azerbaijani-localization add Azerbaijani localization

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PR merged github/training-kit

add Azerbaijani localization

Overview

  • Azerbaijani translation completed
  • Link to index.html added

Review

@GasimGasimzada, please check if there are any translation or grammatical errors.

+175 -0

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pull request commentgithub/training-kit

add Azerbaijani localization

Wow! Thank you so much, @Maharramoff and @GasimGasimzada! ✨

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comment out the entire workflow file

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initial joke action

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create main description for action.yml of joke action

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creating joke.js and main.js

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add joke to action workflow file

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Merge pull request #6 from brianamarie/new-stuff External APIs

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PR merged brianamarie/writing-javascript-actions

External APIs documentation enhancement

yep

+175438 -9

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issue openedbrianamarie/recipes

Fix black eye pea salad

Ivy’s note: I leave bacon out. Also, you can buy the spice “Essence”, but there is also a list of spices to make Essense below the main recipe.). Note: 2017. When I Doubled everything, used oil and vinegar for single recipe. YUMMMMM.

Black-eyed Pea Salad Recipe courtesy Emeril Lagasse, 2004 Prep Time: 10 min Inactive Prep Time: 4 hr 30 min Cook Time:

Level: Easy Serves: 6 cups; 8 servings

Ingredients 5 cups cooked and drained black-eyed peas 4 slices bacon, cooked until crisp and crumbled, fat reserved separately 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1/2 cup olive oil 1/2 cup finely chopped red onion (1/2 medium onion) 1/2 cup red bell pepper 3 tablespoons finely chopped green onions 2 tablespoons finely chopped jalapenos 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley leaves 1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic 1 1/2 teaspoons Essence, recipe follows 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Directions Combine the black-eyed peas, crumbled bacon, 3 tablespoons of the reserved bacon fat, and all remaining ingredients in a large bowl, and toss well to combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight, stirring occasionally. Allow salad to come to room temperature for 30 minutes before serving. Toss well just before serving. Emeril's ESSENCE Creole Seasoning (also referred to as Bayou Blast): 2 1/2 tablespoons paprika 2 tablespoons salt 2 tablespoons garlic powder 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon onion powder 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon dried thyme Combine all ingredients thoroughly. Yield: 2/3 cup Recipe from "New New Orleans Cooking", by Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch Published by William and Morrow, 1993.

created time in 18 days

pull request commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

@crichID I found the culprit - the instruction in step 5 was linking to the wrong file. Not only did I correct the URL, but I also deleted that file from the template repo. 👍 I'm sorry I hadn't caught that before asking you to go through the course!

The most recent version can be found here and is ready for you to go through 😊.

brianamarie

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Briana Swift

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attempt to fix yaml error

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remove course details

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Briana Swift

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add gate and error message for merge conflicts

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Briana Swift

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fix markdown in step 2

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Briana Swift

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link user to correct file in step 5

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Briana Swift

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Merge branch 'audit-rewrite' of https://github.com/githubtraining/write-a-ll-course into audit-rewrite

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Briana Swift

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add a template repo

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Briana Swift

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Merge branch 'master' into course-planning

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remove course-planning doc

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give something changed on this branch

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add smaller steps

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Briana Swift

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Merge pull request #1 from brianamarie/course-planning Choose a topic for your course

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PR merged brianamarie/lab-starter

Choose a topic for your course

Welcome!

This course will walk you through creating your own Learning Lab course. If you've ever wanted to create a learning resource using Learning Lab, then you're in the right place! Together, we'll go through:

  • Picking a topic
  • Breaking the topic down into small steps
  • Designing a learner centered course flow
  • Choosing a project repository
  • Mapping the small steps into GitHub events
  • Writing responses
  • Importing and creating your course

Prerequisites

Choosing a topic

The first thing we're going to do is talk about and choose a topic.

You may already have something in mind for your first course. In this course, you can actually start writing that idea and making it reality! If you're just curious about how to write a course or don't have an idea (yet), try Markdown as a topic.

Here are some things to think about as you select your topic:

Things that work with GitHub

Does it happen on GitHub anyway? Learning Lab is best when it's working with something that it can interact with naturally. Things like painting would be difficult! Commits or interactions with GitHub are the perfect fit.

Scope and size

What's the scope or size? For example, JavaScript makes a lot of sense to teach on Learning Lab because code happens on GitHub. But, it's a really big topic. It may be a good idea to segment your topic into smaller parts. Remember, users can take a series of Labs. If you aren't sure what the right size is, that's OK - that should become more clear as we go on.

Step 1: Choose a topic for your course

Whether you choose your own topic or one of ours, you'll stick with the same one throughout this course. Don't worry, you don't have to publish it right away - we'll show you how to keep your course hidden as a Draft until you are ready to show it to the world.

:keyboard: Activity: Tell us what you'd like to teach

  1. Please comment below with the subject that you'd like to teach in your Learning Lab course. If you don't have an idea yet, you can use Markdown as your topic.

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond below when I detect a comment in this pull request.</h3>

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Briana Swift

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add smaller steps

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pull request commentbrianamarie/lab-starter

Choose a topic for your course

Markdown

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create barnchbrianamarie/lab-starter

branch : map-events

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create barnchbrianamarie/lab-starter

branch : template

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create barnchbrianamarie/lab-starter

branch : course-planning

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create barnchbrianamarie/lab-starter

branch : first-feedback

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create barnchbrianamarie/lab-starter

branch : first-response

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create barnchbrianamarie/lab-starter

branch : master

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pull request commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

Thank you @crichID!! I have gone through and made changes for all of your notes. But, I am still confused by the flow error in step 5. I'm going to go through the course now and try to recreate that, and I'll post findings here. 👀

brianamarie

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Pull request review commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

 title: Write a Learning Lab course tagline: Learn how to author your own Learning Lab course.-description: Get starter code, or let the Learning Lab bot guide you as you author your first course.+description: Use Learning Lab's strengths for fast feedback to author your own course. template:   name: lab-starter-  repo: write-a-ll-course-template+  repo: write-a-ll-course-template-2.0 before:-  - type: createIssue-    title: Welcome-    body: 00.0_welcome.md-    comments:-      - welcome-2.md-  - type: updateBranchProtection+  - type: createLabel+    name: help+    color: ff0000+  - type: createLabel+    name: "1: Committing a header"+    color: 4b0082+  - type: createLabel+    name: "2: Closing an issue"+    color: 0000cd+  - type: createLabel+    name: "3: Fixing a bug"+    color: 40e0d0+  - type: createLabel+    name: "4: Writing a function"+    color: e9967a -# Repo artifacts:-# 1. Issue: Welcome-# 2. PR: Add a course title and description-# 3. PR: Setup the learner's repo-# 4. PR: Write the course steps-# 5. Issue: Publish your course+# Template: +  # [x] Template: commented config, README, course-details.+  # [x] Has labels "help", plus labels corresponding to answers in step 7.+  # [x] Branch `course-planning` for step 1: adding `course-planning.md` file, with a few ideas. User told not to edit the first two.+  # [x] Branch `template` for step 4, with comments added to the place where the template repository goes+  # [x] Branch `map-events` for step 5, with learning objective for 1 mapped out, and 2 is ready to go with comments +  # [x] Branch `first-response` for step 8. After step 7 it gets merged into `map-events`. It has an empty response file for the first step.+  # [x] Branch `first-feedback` for step 11. After step 10 it gets merged into `map-events`. It has two empty response files. -steps:+# Can we check to see if the user imports a course in Learning Lab? :tada:+# Q: Can authors take draft courses?+# I need to make a step for the user to transition their events and steps to the config.+# Maybe make all PRs at beginning, put them on a project board, and link to it for the first step, letting them know they can reuse this and think about these steps when they write courses of their own+# TODO: Can we programmatically get all of the events currently used, and rank them by popularity? For step 5 or 6?+# TODO is step 9 in the config or still planning? Directions are currently unclear. Should it be as a before step, or within another step? -# 1-- title: Welcome-  description: Decide whether to complete a guided course, or use boilerplate as is.-  event: issues-  link: '{{ repoUrl }}/issues/1'-  actions:-  - type: gate-    left: '%payload.issue.title%'-    operator: ===-    right: Welcome-  - type: gate-    left: '%payload.action%'-    operator: ===-    right: closed-    required: false-    else:-    - type: gate-      left: '%payload.action%'-      operator: ===-      right: assigned-    - type: respond-      with: how-to-publish.md-      data: -        url: '%payload.repository.html_url%/fork'-    - type: respond-      with: change-mind.md++# Step 1: Decide what to teach - what's the right step? +  # README.md or course-details+  # We have suggestions but they can also write their own. Our suggestions are ideas, not solutions. Ex: Introduction to GitHub, Introduction to Markdown++  - type: createPullRequest+    title: Choose a topic for your course+    body: 01_welcome.md+    head: course-planning+  - type: updateBranchProtection   - type: createPullRequest-    title: Add a course title and description-    body: 01.0_add-title.md-    head: title-    action_id: metaPR-  - type: assignRegistrant-    issue: '%actions.metaPR.data.number%'-  - type: octokit-    method: pullRequests.createComment-    owner: '%actions.metaPR.data.head.repo.owner.login%'-    repo: '%actions.metaPR.data.head.repo.name%'-    number: '%actions.metaPR.data.number%'-    commit_id: '%actions.metaPR.data.head.sha%'-    path: config.yml-    body: |-      ```suggestion-      title: My amazing course-      ```-    position: 6-  - type: respond-    with: goto-first-pr.md+    title: Choose a template project+    body: 04_choose-a-template.md+    head: template     data:-      url: '%actions.metaPR.data.html_url%'+      url: '%payload.repository.html_url%/edit/template/config.yml?'+  - type: createPullRequest+    title: Map learning objectives to events+    body: 05_map-events.md+    head: map-events+    data:+      url: '%payload.repository.html_url%/edit/map-events/config.yml?' -# 2-- title: Give your course a title-  description: Name your course so learners can find it.-  event: pull_request.synchronize-  link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/1'-  actions:-  - type: getFileContents-    action_id: fileContents-    filename: 'config.yml'-  - type: gate-    left: '/^title: *\w(?![ \t]*#).*$/gm'-    operator: test-    right: '%actions.fileContents%'-    else:+steps:+  - title: Choose a topic for your course+    description: Choose what you'd like to teach through Learning Lab, or borrow one of our suggestions for practice.+    event: issue_comment.created+    link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/1'+    actions:+    # Step 2: Break course into smaller, targeted learning objectives     - type: respond-      with: 02.1_e-no-title.md-  - type: respond-    with: 11.0_add-descriptions.md-  - type: octokit-    method: pullRequests.createComment-    owner: '%payload.repository.owner.login%'-    repo: '%payload.repository.name%'-    number: '%payload.number%'-    commit_id: '%payload.pull_request.head.sha%'-    path: config.yml-    body: |-      ```suggestion-      tagline: Learn how to open a pull request-      ```-    position: 7-  - type: octokit-    method: pullRequests.createComment-    owner: '%payload.repository.owner.login%'-    repo: '%payload.repository.name%'-    number: '%payload.number%'-    commit_id: '%payload.pull_request.head.sha%'-    path: config.yml-    body: |-      ```suggestion-      description: Go from 0 to pull request 1 in less than 10 minutes with this course.-      ```-    position: 8--# 3-- title: Add some descriptions to your course-  description: Give your course a description and tagline so learners can identify it.-  link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/1'-  event: pull_request.synchronize-  actions:-  - type: getFileContents-    action_id: fileContents-    filename: 'config.yml'-  - type: gate-    left: '/^tagline:(?![ \t]*#).*$\ndescription:(?![ \t]*#).*$/gm'-    operator: test-    right: '%actions.fileContents%'-    else:+      with: 02_break-it-down.md+      data:+        url: '%payload.repository.html_url%/edit/course-planning/config.yml?'+  - title: Break your course into smaller steps+    description: Break down what you'd like to teach into smaller learning objectives.+    event: pull_request.synchronize+    link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/1'+    actions: +    # Step 3: Merge the pull request+    - type: removeBranchProtection     - type: respond-      with: 12.1_e-no-meta.md-  - type: requestReviewFromRegistrant-  - type: respond-    with: approve-first-pr.md+      with: 03_merge.md+      data:+        url: '%payload.repository.html_url%/edit/course-planning/config.yml?' -# 4-- title: Approve the course metadata-  description: Approve the pull request containing the course's metadata.-  link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/1'-  event: pull_request_review.submitted-  actions:-  - type: gate-    left: '%payload.review.state%'-    operator: ===-    right: approved-  - type: mergePullRequest-  - type: createPullRequest-    title: Setup the learner's repo-    body: 02.0_add-template.md-    head: repo-setup-    action_id: repoPR-  - type: respond-    with: goto-template-pr.md-    data:-      url: '%actions.repoPR.data.html_url%'-  - type: assignRegistrant-    issue: '%actions.repoPR.data.number%'-  - type: octokit-    method: pullRequests.createComment-    owner: '%actions.repoPR.data.head.repo.owner.login%'-    repo: '%actions.repoPR.data.head.repo.name%'-    number: '%actions.repoPR.data.number%'-    commit_id: '%actions.repoPR.data.head.sha%'-    path: config.yml-    body: |-      ```suggestion-        repo: lab-starter-template-      ```-    position: 7+  - title: Merge your learning objectives+    description: Merge the pull request breaking down your course topic into smaller learning objectives.+    event: pull_request.closed+    link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/1'+    actions:+    - type: gate+      every: true+      gates:+      - left: '%payload.action%'+        operator: ===+        right: closed+      - left: '%payload.pull_request.merged%'+    - type: respond+      with: 03_nice-work.md+    # Step 4: Choose a template project+    - type: updateBranchProtection -# 5-- title: Point to the template repo-  description: Designate a template repository from which to clone.-  link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/2'-  event: pull_request.synchronize-  actions:-  - type: getFileContents-    action_id: fileContents-    filename: 'config.yml'-  - type: gate-    left: '/^\s{2}repo: *lab-starter-template(?!#).*$/gm'-    operator: test-    right: '%actions.fileContents%'-    else:+  - title: Reference the template+    description: Edit the config file to reference your chosen template repository.+    event: pull_request.synchronize+    link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/2'+    actions:+  # - type: gate # we validate that the repository exists     - type: respond-      with: 03.1_e-no-repo.md-  - type: respond-    with: 03.0_add-repo-name.md-  - type: octokit-    method: pullRequests.createComment-    owner: '%payload.repository.owner.login%'-    repo: '%payload.repository.name%'-    number: '%payload.number%'-    commit_id: '%payload.pull_request.head.sha%'-    path: config.yml-    body: |-      ```suggestion-        name: my-sparkles-repo-      ```-    position: 6+      with: 04_good-template.md+    - type: removeBranchProtection+    - type: mergeBranch+      head: template+    - type: mergeBranch+      head: master+      base: map-events+    - type: deleteBranch+      branch: template+  # Step 5: Mapping learning objectives to events and how to choose events that align with the learning objective+    - type: updateBranchProtection -# 6-- title: Give the learner's repo a name-  description: Designate a name for the repository when it is created for the learner.-  link: '{{ repoUrl }}/pull/2'-  event: pull_request.synchronize-  actions:-  - type: getFileContents-    action_id: fileContents-    filename: 'config.yml'-  - type: gate-    left: '/^\s{2}name: *\w(?![ \t]*#).*$/gm'-    operator: test-    right: '%actions.fileContents%'-    else:+  - title: Map learning objectives to events

Hmmm....Interesting! I am going to dig deeper here.

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+# Events++Alright - you've gotten a project chosen, and you've laid out the steps for your learners. Next, we're going to get into something new with Learning Lab: events! (You can learn more detail about this in [the documentation](https://lab.github.com/docs/events).)++An `event` is the webhook that the learner triggers. Events tell Learning Lab that it should do something. [You can see all of the events in GitHub's documentation](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/). Some of the most common examples are `pull_request.synchronize` or `issue.comment`. ++### Map behaviors to events++How can each step translate to a GitHub event? Having too many of the same event may be a bad signal. Make sure that events represent things that you're trying to teach.++For example, you may want to show a lot of information to the learner, and then have them close the issue to signify they've read it. That may make sense for one or two steps in your course. But, imagine going through a whole course like that. It isn't actually checking if the learner read - it's checking if the learner knows how to close issues!++### Choose the right events++Try to choose events that correspond directly to what you want the learner to do. If you're trying to teach the learner to import a `npm` module into a `package.json` file, that commit should be the event.++| Behavior | Events |+| ------------- | ------------- |+| What can I observe that confirms the user demonstrated the skill or knowledge? | What event triggers are available through GitHub? |+| Write a function (commit) | [`pull_request.synchronize`](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/#pullrequestevent) |+| Solve a merge conflict (commit | [`push`](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/#pushevent) |+| Open a pull request | [`pull_request`](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/#pullrequestevent) |+| Implement a test | [`status`](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/#statusevent) |+| Comment on an issue | [`issue_commented.created`](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/#issuecommentevent) |++## Step 5: Map learning objectives to events++Next, your job is to map your learning objectives to events.++Remember the steps you wrote earlier? Let's find the corresponding events. You'll see some are already done for the examples, but you can focus on your own.++### :keyboard: Activity: Map the learning objectives you wrote to specific events from GitHub webhooks++1. Take a look through [GitHub's documentation for event triggers](https://developer.github.com/v3/activity/events/types/).+2. [Edit the `config.yml` file]({{ url }}) on line 29 and make note of the event trigger that matches your first objective.

@crichID I'm open to having the user open their own PR, but I had thought that lines 114-116 in the config, where master is merged into this branch, would have prevented this. When I go through the course after these edits, I will keep an eye out for this.

If the changes were present, would that solve the problem? Or are there other reasons that I'm missing that would make the flow of having the user open the PR easier?

brianamarie

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+Nice template. I'm going to merge this for you. You can find your next steps in [your next pull request]({{ repoUrl }}/pull/3).

Tried this here: f9a2715

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+# Choosing a Template++One of the things that makes Learning Lab special is the ability to learn a skill _in context_. As you think about what you want to teach, it's critical to think about the context that you want to teach your topic in. ++Most courses make use of a [:book: template repository](https://lab.github.com/docs/course-ownership-and-repositories#the-repositories). Learning lab clones template repositories for the learner. Template repositories contain starter code or resources to help them find their way.++> The template will need to be under _the same account as the one who owns this course_.++When creating or choosing a template repository for your course, consider two main points.++### Creating relevant content++First, how will this content help teach the concept? For example, if a course is teaching HTML, the success of the finished product should feature HTML.++If you're teaching JavaScript, an app makes sense. If you're teaching Markdown, maybe you don't need a project at all! With CSS, you could use a project relating to design.++Think of a project that is "real" and practical with the skill you're teaching. Don't introduce too many additional, and possibly confusing, concepts.++### Finished product++Second, is the finished product useful? At the end of the course, the finished repository should serve a purpose aside from the lessons. A working game, a portfolio or resume, or a collection of template documents are a few examples.++## Step 4: Reference the template++Select a template repository - or use ours - based on the things above.++### :keyboard: Activity: Edit the config file to reference your chosen template repository++1. Choose a repository to be a template. +    - It's important that {{ owner }}, the owner of _this_ repository, is also the owner of the template repository.+    - It doesn't have to be complete, but it should have at least one commit. If you don't know where to begin, you can [fork this github-games repository](https://github.com/githubtraining/github-games) and use that until you have built one yourself.+2. [Edit the `config.yml` file in this branch]({{ url }}) to replace the commented `name` and `repo`.

Tried this here; f9a2715

brianamarie

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+# Choosing a Template++One of the things that makes Learning Lab special is the ability to learn a skill _in context_. As you think about what you want to teach, it's critical to think about the context that you want to teach your topic in. ++Most courses make use of a [:book: template repository](https://lab.github.com/docs/course-ownership-and-repositories#the-repositories). Learning lab clones template repositories for the learner. Template repositories contain starter code or resources to help them find their way.++> The template will need to be under _the same account as the one who owns this course_.++When creating or choosing a template repository for your course, consider two main points.++### Creating relevant content++First, how will this content help teach the concept? For example, if a course is teaching HTML, the success of the finished product should feature HTML.++If you're teaching JavaScript, an app makes sense. If you're teaching Markdown, maybe you don't need a project at all! With CSS, you could use a project relating to design.++Think of a project that is "real" and practical with the skill you're teaching. Don't introduce too many additional, and possibly confusing, concepts.++### Finished product++Second, is the finished product useful? At the end of the course, the finished repository should serve a purpose aside from the lessons. A working game, a portfolio or resume, or a collection of template documents are a few examples.++## Step 4: Reference the template++Select a template repository - or use ours - based on the things above.++### :keyboard: Activity: Edit the config file to reference your chosen template repository++1. Choose a repository to be a template. +    - It's important that {{ owner }}, the owner of _this_ repository, is also the owner of the template repository.+    - It doesn't have to be complete, but it should have at least one commit. If you don't know where to begin, you can [fork this github-games repository](https://github.com/githubtraining/github-games) and use that until you have built one yourself.+2. [Edit the `config.yml` file in this branch]({{ url }}) to replace the commented `name` and `repo`.

Ah - I see. I'm thinking about the steps that we would add by having them create the PR themselves, and the tradeoff of the whole thing. What if we keep the PR created by the bot, but have it created right before it's needed. And, to your point below, before we say we'll merge, we check if it's mergable, and give a few instructions for solving the merge conflict if they do have one? What do you think?

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+Great! When you commented, you triggered something called a webhook that I heard, and now I'm here! You may be wondering if I checked to see if  what you wrote was a _real_ topic. We'll talk about that kind of logic later - both how to use it, and when to use it. (Spoiler - for this step, I didn't check! I am pretty smart, but not smart enough to tell if you typed a good idea or not.)++### Breaking goals into smaller steps++Now that you know what you want to teach, the next thing to do is break it down into steps. This can be tricky - put on a teacher hat and an engineer hat at the same time.++To break down the thing you want to teach, think about the observable behaviors. They should show that the user is doing it right. If you were watching this person, how would you know they've mastered the thing? Some examples are:++- Close an issue+- Write a functional SQL query+- Merge a pull request+- Change code so a particular test passes++### What NOT to do++It is _not_ a good idea to have huge or ambiguous steps.++Put yourself in the shoes of a beginner. If you're asked to do something too big that you don't understand, it can be frustrating. Asking the learner to do something poorly defined creates confusion and misunderstandings. This can make the learner give up!++> Imagine you're taking a course on SQL as a beginner. If one of the steps is to write a full query, you might not know where to start. You may try your best, but still be confused about what isn't working. Or, if you can get it right from copying and pasting, you wouldn't understand it well enough to do it on your own. Stick to smaller steps, and include prerequisites at the beginning of the course.++## Step 2: Break your course into smaller steps++In the file in this pull request, write the steps as observable behaviors. It's OK if there are a lot. It's better to break it down into small steps. Then, you may realize the scope of the course is wrong. That is better than having huge or unmanageable steps.++### :keyboard: Activity: Break down what you'd like to teach into smaller learning objectives++1. [Edit lines `config.yml` document]({{ url }}). Break down the larger goal into smaller steps and add them to the commented descriptions on lines 26, 35, 40, 47, and 54.+2. In each step, notice the fields for `title` and `description`. These will be shown to the learner on Learning Lab. Write the titles and descriptions of each of your steps.+3. Commit your changes.++<hr>+<h3 align="center">I'll respond below when I detect a commit on this branch.</h3>

👍 fbb121f & 26440b38

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+Great! When you commented, you triggered something called a webhook that I heard, and now I'm here! You may be wondering if I checked to see if  what you wrote was a _real_ topic. We'll talk about that kind of logic later - both how to use it, and when to use it. (Spoiler - for this step, I didn't check! I am pretty smart, but not smart enough to tell if you typed a good idea or not.)++### Breaking goals into smaller steps++Now that you know what you want to teach, the next thing to do is break it down into steps. This can be tricky - put on a teacher hat and an engineer hat at the same time.++To break down the thing you want to teach, think about the observable behaviors. They should show that the user is doing it right. If you were watching this person, how would you know they've mastered the thing? Some examples are:++- Close an issue+- Write a functional SQL query+- Merge a pull request+- Change code so a particular test passes++### What NOT to do++It is _not_ a good idea to have huge or ambiguous steps.++Put yourself in the shoes of a beginner. If you're asked to do something too big that you don't understand, it can be frustrating. Asking the learner to do something poorly defined creates confusion and misunderstandings. This can make the learner give up!++> Imagine you're taking a course on SQL as a beginner. If one of the steps is to write a full query, you might not know where to start. You may try your best, but still be confused about what isn't working. Or, if you can get it right from copying and pasting, you wouldn't understand it well enough to do it on your own. Stick to smaller steps, and include prerequisites at the beginning of the course.++## Step 2: Break your course into smaller steps++In the file in this pull request, write the steps as observable behaviors. It's OK if there are a lot. It's better to break it down into small steps. Then, you may realize the scope of the course is wrong. That is better than having huge or unmanageable steps.++### :keyboard: Activity: Break down what you'd like to teach into smaller learning objectives++1. [Edit lines `config.yml` document]({{ url }}). Break down the larger goal into smaller steps and add them to the commented descriptions on lines 26, 35, 40, 47, and 54.+2. In each step, notice the fields for `title` and `description`. These will be shown to the learner on Learning Lab. Write the titles and descriptions of each of your steps.

👍 378ff1e

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+Great! When you commented, you triggered something called a webhook that I heard, and now I'm here! You may be wondering if I checked to see if  what you wrote was a _real_ topic. We'll talk about that kind of logic later - both how to use it, and when to use it. (Spoiler - for this step, I didn't check! I am pretty smart, but not smart enough to tell if you typed a good idea or not.)++### Breaking goals into smaller steps++Now that you know what you want to teach, the next thing to do is break it down into steps. This can be tricky - put on a teacher hat and an engineer hat at the same time.++To break down the thing you want to teach, think about the observable behaviors. They should show that the user is doing it right. If you were watching this person, how would you know they've mastered the thing? Some examples are:++- Close an issue+- Write a functional SQL query+- Merge a pull request+- Change code so a particular test passes++### What NOT to do++It is _not_ a good idea to have huge or ambiguous steps.++Put yourself in the shoes of a beginner. If you're asked to do something too big that you don't understand, it can be frustrating. Asking the learner to do something poorly defined creates confusion and misunderstandings. This can make the learner give up!++> Imagine you're taking a course on SQL as a beginner. If one of the steps is to write a full query, you might not know where to start. You may try your best, but still be confused about what isn't working. Or, if you can get it right from copying and pasting, you wouldn't understand it well enough to do it on your own. Stick to smaller steps, and include prerequisites at the beginning of the course.++## Step 2: Break your course into smaller steps++In the file in this pull request, write the steps as observable behaviors. It's OK if there are a lot. It's better to break it down into small steps. Then, you may realize the scope of the course is wrong. That is better than having huge or unmanageable steps.++### :keyboard: Activity: Break down what you'd like to teach into smaller learning objectives++1. [Edit lines `config.yml` document]({{ url }}). Break down the larger goal into smaller steps and add them to the commented descriptions on lines 26, 35, 40, 47, and 54.

👍 1e35f54

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+Great! When you commented, you triggered something called a webhook that I heard, and now I'm here! You may be wondering if I checked to see if  what you wrote was a _real_ topic. We'll talk about that kind of logic later - both how to use it, and when to use it. (Spoiler - for this step, I didn't check! I am pretty smart, but not smart enough to tell if you typed a good idea or not.)++### Breaking goals into smaller steps

👍 c25d5d9

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+# Welcome!++This course will walk you through creating your own Learning Lab course. If you've ever wanted to create a learning resource using Learning Lab, then you're in the right place! Together, we'll go through:++- Picking a topic+- Breaking the topic down into smaller steps+- Designing a course flow for the learners+- Choosing a project repository+- Mapping the smaller steps into GitHub events+- Writing responses+- Importing and creating your course++### Prerequisites++- **GitHub knowledge**: For this course, you'll need to know about GitHub. If you need a refresher on the GitHub flow, check out [the Introduction to GitHub course]({{ host}}/courses/introduction-to-github).+- **Webhooks & the GitHub API**: You'll also need a general understanding of webhooks and the GitHub API.  Try [the Getting started with GitHub Apps course]({{ host}}/courses/getting-started-with-github-apps).++### Choosing a topic++The first thing we're going to do is talk about and choose a topic.++If you'd like to teach something on Learning Lab, you may already have something in mind. For this course, you can actually start writing that idea and making it reality! If you're curious about how to write a course and would rather use our idea, try  Markdown as a topic.++#### Things that work with GitHub++Here are some things to think about: Does it happen on GitHub anyway? Learning Lab is best when it's working with something that it can interact with naturally. Things like painting would be difficult! Commits or interactions with GitHub are the perfect fit.++#### Scope and size++What's the scope or size? For example, JavaScript makes a lot of sense to teach on Learning Lab because code happens on GitHub. But, it's a really big topic. It may be a good idea to segment your topic into smaller parts. Remember, users can take a series of Labs. If you aren't sure what the right size is, that's OK - that should become more clear as we go on.++## Step 1: Choose a topic for your course++Whether you choose your own topic or one of ours, we'll stick with the same one throughout this course. Choose one now.++### :keyboard: Activity: Choose what you'd like to teach through Learning Lab, or borrow one of our suggestions for practice++1. Please comment below with the subject that you'd like to teach in your Learning Lab course.

👍 Addressed: dd028b7

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+# Welcome!++This course will walk you through creating your own Learning Lab course. If you've ever wanted to create a learning resource using Learning Lab, then you're in the right place! Together, we'll go through:++- Picking a topic+- Breaking the topic down into smaller steps+- Designing a course flow for the learners+- Choosing a project repository+- Mapping the smaller steps into GitHub events+- Writing responses+- Importing and creating your course++### Prerequisites++- **GitHub knowledge**: For this course, you'll need to know about GitHub. If you need a refresher on the GitHub flow, check out [the Introduction to GitHub course]({{ host}}/courses/introduction-to-github).+- **Webhooks & the GitHub API**: You'll also need a general understanding of webhooks and the GitHub API.  Try [the Getting started with GitHub Apps course]({{ host}}/courses/getting-started-with-github-apps).++### Choosing a topic++The first thing we're going to do is talk about and choose a topic.++If you'd like to teach something on Learning Lab, you may already have something in mind. For this course, you can actually start writing that idea and making it reality! If you're curious about how to write a course and would rather use our idea, try  Markdown as a topic.++#### Things that work with GitHub++Here are some things to think about: Does it happen on GitHub anyway? Learning Lab is best when it's working with something that it can interact with naturally. Things like painting would be difficult! Commits or interactions with GitHub are the perfect fit.++#### Scope and size++What's the scope or size? For example, JavaScript makes a lot of sense to teach on Learning Lab because code happens on GitHub. But, it's a really big topic. It may be a good idea to segment your topic into smaller parts. Remember, users can take a series of Labs. If you aren't sure what the right size is, that's OK - that should become more clear as we go on.++## Step 1: Choose a topic for your course++Whether you choose your own topic or one of ours, we'll stick with the same one throughout this course. Choose one now.++### :keyboard: Activity: Choose what you'd like to teach through Learning Lab, or borrow one of our suggestions for practice

👍 Accepting suggestion and 23e05bc

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+# Welcome!++This course will walk you through creating your own Learning Lab course. If you've ever wanted to create a learning resource using Learning Lab, then you're in the right place! Together, we'll go through:++- Picking a topic+- Breaking the topic down into smaller steps+- Designing a course flow for the learners+- Choosing a project repository+- Mapping the smaller steps into GitHub events+- Writing responses+- Importing and creating your course++### Prerequisites

Addressed in 7fac7a1

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 Learning Lab helps people build real world skills through hands-on activities. This course streamlines the course building process, and gives you all the tools you need to help others learn.  -Register for this course to get the starter files needed to build your Learning Lab course, or complete the course steps for a fully guided experience. If you choose to complete the course, you'll be able to:+If you'd like to get started in building courses for others, this is the course for you! If you choose to complete the course, you'll be able to: +- Design a course using your chosen topic+- Break down your topic into smaller steps for GitHub - Identify the structure of a Learning Lab course-- Define a title and description for your course - Define a template repository - Create course steps - Create responses - Publish a course to GitHub Learning Lab++Prerequisites:++- **GitHub knowledge**: For this course, you'll need to know about GitHub. If you need a refresher on the GitHub flow, check out [the Introduction to GitHub course]({{ host}}/courses/introduction-to-github).+- **Webhooks & the GitHub API**: You'll also need a general understanding of webhooks and the GitHub API.  Try [the Getting started with GitHub Apps course]({{ host}}/courses/getting-started-with-github-apps).

Addressed in a8ca560

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Pull request review commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

 Learning Lab helps people build real world skills through hands-on activities. This course streamlines the course building process, and gives you all the tools you need to help others learn.  -Register for this course to get the starter files needed to build your Learning Lab course, or complete the course steps for a fully guided experience. If you choose to complete the course, you'll be able to:+If you'd like to get started in building courses for others, this is the course for you! If you choose to complete the course, you'll be able to:

👍 Addressed a8ca560

brianamarie

comment created time in 19 days

Pull request review commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

 title: Write a Learning Lab course tagline: Learn how to author your own Learning Lab course.-description: Get starter code, or let the Learning Lab bot guide you as you author your first course.+description: Use Learning Lab's strengths for fast feedback to author your own course. template:   name: lab-starter-  repo: write-a-ll-course-template+  repo: write-a-ll-course-template-2.0 before:-  - type: createIssue-    title: Welcome-    body: 00.0_welcome.md-    comments:-      - welcome-2.md-  - type: updateBranchProtection+  - type: createLabel+    name: help+    color: ff0000+  - type: createLabel+    name: "1: Committing a header"+    color: 4b0082+  - type: createLabel+    name: "2: Closing an issue"+    color: 0000cd+  - type: createLabel+    name: "3: Fixing a bug"+    color: 40e0d0+  - type: createLabel+    name: "4: Writing a function"+    color: e9967a -# Repo artifacts:-# 1. Issue: Welcome-# 2. PR: Add a course title and description-# 3. PR: Setup the learner's repo-# 4. PR: Write the course steps-# 5. Issue: Publish your course+# Template: +  # [x] Template: commented config, README, course-details.+  # [x] Has labels "help", plus labels corresponding to answers in step 7.+  # [x] Branch `course-planning` for step 1: adding `course-planning.md` file, with a few ideas. User told not to edit the first two.+  # [x] Branch `template` for step 4, with comments added to the place where the template repository goes+  # [x] Branch `map-events` for step 5, with learning objective for 1 mapped out, and 2 is ready to go with comments +  # [x] Branch `first-response` for step 8. After step 7 it gets merged into `map-events`. It has an empty response file for the first step.+  # [x] Branch `first-feedback` for step 11. After step 10 it gets merged into `map-events`. It has two empty response files. -steps:+# Can we check to see if the user imports a course in Learning Lab? :tada:+# Q: Can authors take draft courses?

👍 Good point - addressed in c7e14bc

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Pull request review commentgithubtraining/write-a-ll-course

Audit rewrite

 title: Write a Learning Lab course tagline: Learn how to author your own Learning Lab course.-description: Get starter code, or let the Learning Lab bot guide you as you author your first course.+description: Use Learning Lab's strengths for fast feedback to author your own course. template:   name: lab-starter-  repo: write-a-ll-course-template+  repo: write-a-ll-course-template-2.0

This is a placeholder, because the template course requires such a major change, it would break the currently launched course. It should definitely be updated once this branch is merged. I'll add a note to the original post of this PR.

brianamarie

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delete branch brianamarie/writing-javascript-actions

delete branch : hello-world

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correct yaml in my-workflow

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syntax

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SYNTAX?

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Merge pull request #4 from brianamarie/hello-world Hello Action

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PR merged brianamarie/writing-javascript-actions

Hello Action

Action metadata

The failing workflow

Before we jump into the details of Action metadata, it might be helpful to examine our workflow to understand the order that things happen. I have attached a screenshot below of the most recent workflow run, you can also follow along by clicking on the Actions tab for your repository.

Notice that our third workflow step, the one that is looking for our Action is failing. We expect this, but the magic ✨is in the error message!

That step is looking for a specific file, and in our case it's looking for the action.yml file. It's not looking for a JavaScript file or a config.yml file.

Because that file is non-existent in the hello-world directory we see this error. So let's start by talking about, and creating, that action.yml file.

The need to know of Action metadata

Every GitHub Action that we write needs to be accompanied by a metadata file. This file has a few rules to it, lets outline those now:

  • Filename must be action.yml
  • Required for both Docker container and JavaScript Actions
  • Written in YAML syntax

This file defines the following information about your Action:

Parameter Description Required
Name The name of your Action. Helps visually identify the Actions in a job. :white_check_mark:
Description A summary of what your Action does. :white_check_mark:
Inputs Input parameters allow you to specify data that the action expects to use during runtime. These parameters become environment variables in the runner.
Outputs Specifies the data that subsequent actions can use later in the workflow after the action that defines these outputs has run.
Runs The command to run when the Action executes. :white_check_mark:
Branding You can use a color and Feather icon to create a badge to personalize and distinguish your action in GitHub Marketplace.

📖Read more about Action metadata

+665 -7

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issue openedgithubtraining/express-template

Archiving this repository

I do not believe this repository is in active development or being used for any Learning Lab courses. I am going to archive this repo - please let me know if this should be un-done.

created time in 20 days

pull request commentgithubtraining/react-template

Bump handlebars from 4.1.2 to 4.5.3

@dependabot merge

dependabot[bot]

comment created time in 20 days

pull request commentgithubtraining/react-template

Bump handlebars from 4.1.2 to 4.5.3

Related: https://github.com/githubtraining/react-solution/pull/4

dependabot[bot]

comment created time in 20 days

issue openedgithubtraining/react-course

react-solution not spinning up

Bug Report

Current behavior The repository used as a "solution", https://github.com/githubtraining/react-solution/, will not spin up correctly locally with npm start.

Reproduction Steps to reproduce the behavior in the course:

  1. Clone https://github.com/githubtraining/react-solution/
  2. CD into the repo
  3. Run npm start
  4. See error

Expected behavior I would expect the solution repository to be able to work immediately upon clone

Additional context I found this out when testing a dependabot PR - I wanted to see that things worked as they would on master and found that master doesn't work either.

cc @hectorsector @partyshah

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pull request commentgithubtraining/react-solution

Bump handlebars from 4.1.2 to 4.5.3

@dependabot merge

dependabot[bot]

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pull request commentgithubtraining/react-solution

Bump handlebars from 4.1.2 to 4.5.3

Before merging, I wanted to make sure this would work as expected. I am unable to get npm start to work successfully on master. I am going to opt for fixing this vulnerability with the knowledge that it may make troubleshooting the build more difficult in the future, but I will also open an issue in the course repository.

dependabot[bot]

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pull request commentgithub/training-kit

Add more general Git and GitHub

Hi @DylanAStark! Thank you for your review - and your patience while I got to it. I made some changes based on your comments, and left a few other clarifying questions for some of the other points. Let me know what you think!

brianamarie

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Pull request review commentgithub/training-kit

Add more general Git and GitHub

+# Git Guide++Everything you need to know about Git, from getting started to advanced commands and workflows.++## What is Git?++Git is distributed version control software. Version control is a way to save changes over time without overwriting previous versions. Being distributed means that every developer working with a Git repository has a copy of that entire repository - every commit, every branch, every file. If you're used to working with centralized version control systems, this is a big difference!++Whether or not you've worked with version control before, there are a few things you should know before getting started with Git:++- Branches are lightweight and cheap, so it's OK to have many of them+- Git stores changes in SHA hashes, which work by compressing text files. That makes Git a very good version control system (VCS) for software programming, but not so good for binary files like images or videos.+- Git repositories can be connected, so you can work on one locally on your own machine, and connect it to a shared repository. This way, you can push and pull changes to a repository and easily collaborate with others.++## Why Use Git?++Version control is very important - without it, you risk losing your work. With Git, you can make a "commit", or a save point, as often as you'd like. You can also go back to previous commits. This takes the pressure off of you while you're working. Commit often and commit early, and you'll never have that gut sinking feeling of overwriting or losing changes.++There are many version control systems out there - but Git has some major advantages.++- Like we mentioned above, Git uses SHA compression, which makes it very fast.+- Git can handle merge conflicts, which mean that it's OK for multiple people to work on the same file at the same time. This opens up the world of development in a way that isn't possible with centralized version control. You have access to the entire project, and if you're working on a branch, you can do whatever you need to and know that your changes are safe.+- Speaking of branches, Git offers a lot of flexibility and opportunity for collaboration with branches. By using branches, developers can make changes in a safe sandbox. Instead of only committing code that is 100% sure to succeed, developers can commit code that might still need help. Then, they can push that code to the remote and get fast feedback from integrated tests or peer review. Without sharing the code through branches, this would never be possible.+- Ease of roll back - if you make a mistake, it's OK! Commits are immutable, meaning they can't be changed. (*Note: You _can_ change history, but it will create new replacement commits instead of editing the existing commits. More on that later!*) This means that if you do make a mistake, even on an important branch like master, it's _OK_. You can easily revert that change, or roll back the branch pointer to the commit where everything was fine. The benefits of this can't be overstated. Not only does it create a safer environment for the project and code, but it fosters a development environment where developers can be braver, trusting that Git has their back.

Attempted in 52db0afb

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Pull request review commentgithub/training-kit

Add more general Git and GitHub

+# Git Commit++Commits are snapshots of your entire repository at specific times. You should make new commits often, based around logical units of change. Over time, commits should tell a story of the history of your repository and how it came to be the way that it currently is. Commits include lots of metadata in addition to the contents and message, like the author, timestamp, and more.++<!--- Link related terms here in some way – spiderweb navigation to help users easily answer the next logical question after searching “Git Commit”. Potentially link to roll up section.-->++## How Git Commit Works++Commits are the building blocks of "save points" within Git's version control.++By using commits, you're able to craft history intentionally and safely. You can make commits to different branches, and specify exactly what changes you want to include. Commits are created on the branch that you're currently checked out to (wherever HEAD is pointing) so it's always a good idea to run `git status` before making a commit, to check that you're checked-out to the branch that you intend to be. Before you commit, you will need to stage any new changes that you'd like to include in the commit using `git add [file]`.++Commits are lightweight SHA hashes, objects within Git. As long as you're working with text files, you won't need to worry about how many files you have, how big they are, or how many commits you make. Git can handle it!++## How to Use Git Commit++### Common usages and options for Git Commit.++Commits have two phases to help you craft commits properly. Commits should be logical, atomic units of change that represent a specific idea. But, not all humans work that way. You may get carried away and end up solving two or three problems before you remember to commit! That's OK - Git can handle that. Once you're ready to craft your commits, you'll use `git add <FILENAME>` to specify the files that you'd like to "stage" for commit. Without adding any files, the command `git commit` won't work. Git only looks to the staging area to find out what to commit. Staging, or adding, files, is possible through the command line, and also possible with most Git interfaces like GitHub Desktop by selecting the lines or files that you'd like to stage.++You can also use a handy command, `git add -p`, to walk through the changes and separate them out, even if they're in the same file.++- `git commit`: This starts the commit process, but since it doesn't include a `-m` flag for the message, your default text editor will be opened for you to create the commit message. If you haven't configured anything, there's a good chance this will be VI or Vim. (To get out, press esc, then `:w`, and then Enter. :wink:)+- `git commit -m "descriptive commit message"`: This starts the commit process, and allows you to include the commit message at the same time.+- `git commit -am "descriptive commit message"`: In addition to including the commit message, this option allows you to skip the staging phase. The addition of `-a` will automatically stage any files that are already being tracked by Git (changes to files that you've committed before).+- `git commit --amend`: Replaces the most recent commit with a new commit. (More on this later!)++To see all of the possible options you have with `git commit`, check out [Git's documentation](https://git-scm.com/docs/git-commit).++### How to Undo Commits in Git++Sometimes, you may need to change history. You may need to undo a commit. If you find yourself in this situation, there are a few very important things to remember:++- If you are "undoing" a commit that exists on the remote, you could create big problems for your collaborators+- Undoing a commit on work that you only have locally is much safer++#### `git revert`++`git revert` is the safest way to change history with Git. Instead of deleting existing commits, `git revert` looks at the changes introduced in a specific commit, then applies the inverse of those changes in a new commit. It functions as an "undo commit" command, without sacrificing the integrity of your repository's history. **`git revert` is always the recommended way to change history when it's possible**. ++#### `git reset`++Sometimes, a commit includes sensitive information and needs to actually be deleted. `git reset` is a very powerful command that may cause you to lose work. By resetting, you move the `HEAD` pointer and the branch pointer to another point in time - maybe making it seem like the commits in between never happened! Before using `git reset`:++- Make sure to talk with your team about any shared commits+- Research the three types of reset to see which is right for you (--soft, --mixed, --hard)+- Commit any work that you don't want to be lost intentionally - work that is committed can be gotten back, but uncommitted work cannot++#### `git reflog`++If you're changing history and undoing commits, you should know about `git reflog`. If you get into trouble, the reflog could get you out of trouble. The reflog is a log of every commit that `HEAD` has pointed to. So, for example, if you use `git reset` and unintentionally lose commits, you can find and access them with `git reflog`.++### Updating Commits With Git Commit Amend++While `git commit --amend` does change history, it only changes the most recent commit on your current branch. This can be an extremely useful command for commits that:++- Haven't been pushed to the remote yet+- Have a spelling error in the commit message+- Don't contain the changes that you'd like to contain++## Examples of Git Commit++Once you've staged the files that you want to include in your commit, you're ready. Whether you commit in a tool like GitHub Desktop, or through your command line, the commit message is important. Commit messages should be short and descriptive of your change. If you are looking through your repository's history, you'll be guided by the commit messages, so they should tell a story. Commits in the command line can include the message with the following format:++- `git commit -m "git commit message example"`++Commit messages should be present tense and directive, like the following examples:++- `git commit -m "create file structure for Git guides"`+- `git commit -m "translate Git cheat sheet into German"`+- `git commit -m "update broken URL to Git resources"`++If you'd like to include more context in your commit messages, you can also include an extended commit message.

Attempted in 35a7a82f

brianamarie

comment created time in a month

Pull request review commentgithub/training-kit

Add more general Git and GitHub

+# Git Commit++Commits are snapshots of your entire repository at specific times. You should make new commits often, based around logical units of change. Over time, commits should tell a story of the history of your repository and how it came to be the way that it currently is. Commits include lots of metadata in addition to the contents and message, like the author, timestamp, and more.++<!--- Link related terms here in some way – spiderweb navigation to help users easily answer the next logical question after searching “Git Commit”. Potentially link to roll up section.-->++## How Git Commit Works++Commits are the building blocks of "save points" within Git's version control.++By using commits, you're able to craft history intentionally and safely. You can make commits to different branches, and specify exactly what changes you want to include. Commits are created on the branch that you're currently checked out to (wherever HEAD is pointing) so it's always a good idea to run `git status` before making a commit, to check that you're checked-out to the branch that you intend to be. Before you commit, you will need to stage any new changes that you'd like to include in the commit using `git add [file]`.++Commits are lightweight SHA hashes, objects within Git. As long as you're working with text files, you won't need to worry about how many files you have, how big they are, or how many commits you make. Git can handle it!++## How to Use Git Commit++### Common usages and options for Git Commit.++Commits have two phases to help you craft commits properly. Commits should be logical, atomic units of change that represent a specific idea. But, not all humans work that way. You may get carried away and end up solving two or three problems before you remember to commit! That's OK - Git can handle that. Once you're ready to craft your commits, you'll use `git add <FILENAME>` to specify the files that you'd like to "stage" for commit. Without adding any files, the command `git commit` won't work. Git only looks to the staging area to find out what to commit. Staging, or adding, files, is possible through the command line, and also possible with most Git interfaces like GitHub Desktop by selecting the lines or files that you'd like to stage.++You can also use a handy command, `git add -p`, to walk through the changes and separate them out, even if they're in the same file.++- `git commit`: This starts the commit process, but since it doesn't include a `-m` flag for the message, your default text editor will be opened for you to create the commit message. If you haven't configured anything, there's a good chance this will be VI or Vim. (To get out, press esc, then `:w`, and then Enter. :wink:)+- `git commit -m "descriptive commit message"`: This starts the commit process, and allows you to include the commit message at the same time.+- `git commit -am "descriptive commit message"`: In addition to including the commit message, this option allows you to skip the staging phase. The addition of `-a` will automatically stage any files that are already being tracked by Git (changes to files that you've committed before).+- `git commit --amend`: Replaces the most recent commit with a new commit. (More on this later!)++To see all of the possible options you have with `git commit`, check out [Git's documentation](https://git-scm.com/docs/git-commit).++### How to Undo Commits in Git++Sometimes, you may need to change history. You may need to undo a commit. If you find yourself in this situation, there are a few very important things to remember:++- If you are "undoing" a commit that exists on the remote, you could create big problems for your collaborators+- Undoing a commit on work that you only have locally is much safer

Attempted in 3e19c8b9

brianamarie

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Pull request review commentgithub/training-kit

Add more general Git and GitHub

+# Git Commit++Commits are snapshots of your entire repository at specific times. You should make new commits often, based around logical units of change. Over time, commits should tell a story of the history of your repository and how it came to be the way that it currently is. Commits include lots of metadata in addition to the contents and message, like the author, timestamp, and more.++<!--- Link related terms here in some way – spiderweb navigation to help users easily answer the next logical question after searching “Git Commit”. Potentially link to roll up section.-->++## How Git Commit Works++Commits are the building blocks of "save points" within Git's version control.++By using commits, you're able to craft history intentionally and safely. You can make commits to different branches, and specify exactly what changes you want to include. Commits are created on the branch that you're currently checked out to (wherever HEAD is pointing) so it's always a good idea to run `git status` before making a commit, to check that you're checked-out to the branch that you intend to be. Before you commit, you will need to stage any new changes that you'd like to include in the commit using `git add [file]`.++Commits are lightweight SHA hashes, objects within Git. As long as you're working with text files, you won't need to worry about how many files you have, how big they are, or how many commits you make. Git can handle it!++## How to Use Git Commit++### Common usages and options for Git Commit.++Commits have two phases to help you craft commits properly. Commits should be logical, atomic units of change that represent a specific idea. But, not all humans work that way. You may get carried away and end up solving two or three problems before you remember to commit! That's OK - Git can handle that. Once you're ready to craft your commits, you'll use `git add <FILENAME>` to specify the files that you'd like to "stage" for commit. Without adding any files, the command `git commit` won't work. Git only looks to the staging area to find out what to commit. Staging, or adding, files, is possible through the command line, and also possible with most Git interfaces like GitHub Desktop by selecting the lines or files that you'd like to stage.++You can also use a handy command, `git add -p`, to walk through the changes and separate them out, even if they're in the same file.

Attempted to capture this in c9f00418

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