profile
viewpoint
If you are wondering where the data of this site comes from, please visit https://api.github.com/users/Bakedpeddler100/events. GitMemory does not store any data, but only uses NGINX to cache data for a period of time. The idea behind GitMemory is simply to give users a better reading experience.
Bakedpeddler100 Hippity-Hoppity, you may dare to touch my code property o.o

Bakedpeddler100/mini_project 1

mini project<sentimental analysis>

Bakedpeddler100/Ultimate-Logic 1

Create Pull Requests for Hacktoberfest.

Bakedpeddler100/bakedpeddler.github.io 0

I don't know what I'm doing.

Bakedpeddler100/Bakedpeddler100 0

Laughing in Camus way

Bakedpeddler100/bubble-popper 0

Use jQuery & CSS animations and transitions to make a small application that makes and pops random bubbles.

Bakedpeddler100/code-in-place 0

A first-of-its-kind volunteer-led course, hosted by Stanford University. Code in Place is built off the first half of CS106A.

Bakedpeddler100/github-slideshow 0

A robot powered training repository :robot:

Bakedpeddler100/GitHubGraduation-2021 0

Join the GitHub Graduation Yearbook and "walk the stage" on June 5.

Bakedpeddler100/Hacktoberfest 0

Participate in Hacktoberfest. Learn and get started. Contribute to open source. Make sure your pull requests are legitimate. Enjoy and have fun.

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Add Bakedpeddler100's file

Nice work

celebrate

Congratulations @Bakedpeddler100, you've completed this course!

What went well

Now, you have your slide deck deployed here and you've gone through the GitHub Flow.

Before I say good-bye, here's a recap of all the tasks you've accomplished in your repository:

  • You learned about issues, pull requests, and the structure of a GitHub repository
  • You learned about branching
  • You created a commit
  • You viewed and responded to pull request reviews
  • You edited an existing file
  • You enabled GitHub Pages
  • You made your first contribution! :tada:

Give us feedback

We'd love to hear what you thought of this course. Please share your feedback in this brief survey.

What's next?

We hope this course helped you feel more comfortable using GitHub. Remember: You’re always welcome to repeat course topics if you’d like additional practice. If you’re ready to build on your new skills, here are some ideas.

Contribute to a project

To find projects to contribute to through trending topics and curated collections, check out GitHub Explore.

Keep learning

Here are some suggestions for future courses you can take:

  • GitHub Pages: Continue learning about GitHub Pages, which we touched on in this course.
  • Communicating using Markdown: We used a little Markdown in this course, but if you want to learn all about this :sparkles: syntax, take the course!

What will you learn next?

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

issue closedBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Your first contribution

Introduction to GitHub flow

Now that you're familiar with issues, let's use this issue to track your path to your first contribution.

People use different workflows to contribute to software projects, but the simplest and most effective way to contribute on GitHub is the GitHub flow.

:tv: Video: Understanding the GitHub flow

<hr> <h3 align="center">Read below for next steps</h3>

closed time in a month

github-learning-lab[bot]

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Your first contribution

Step 6: Open a pull request

Nice work making that commit :sparkles:

Now that you’ve created a commit, it’s time to share your proposed change through a pull request! Where issues encourage discussion with other contributors and collaborators on a project, pull requests help you share your changes, receive feedback on them, and iterate on them until they’re perfect!

<details><summary>What is a pull request?</summary>

Pull requests

Let’s think back to the GitHub flow again. You have created a branch, added a file, and committed the file to your branch. Now it’s time to collaborate on your file with other students taking this class. This collaboration happens in a pull request. Check out this video to learn more:

:tv: Video: Introduction to pull requests <hr> </details>

This pull request is going to keep the changes you just made on your branch and propose applying them to the main branch.

:keyboard: Activity: Create a pull request

  1. Open a pull request using this shortcut or manually as follows:
    • From the "Pull requests" tab, click New pull request
    • In the "base:" drop-down menu, make sure the "main" branch is selected
    • In the "compare:" drop-down menu, select "my-slide"
  2. When you’ve selected your branch, enter a title for your pull request. For example Add Bakedpeddler100's file
  3. The next field helps you provide a description of the changes you made. Feel free to add a description of what you’ve accomplished so far. As a reminder, you have: created a branch, created a file and made a commit, and opened a pull request
  4. Click Create pull request

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond in your new pull request.</h3>

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Your first contribution

Step 5: Commit a file

:tada: You created a branch!

Creating a branch allows you to make modifications to your project without changing the deployed main branch. Now that you have a branch, it’s time to create a file and make your first commit!

<details><summary>Commits 101</summary>

Commits 101

When you’re finished creating or making changes to a file on GitHub, scroll to the bottom of the page. Then find the "Commit new file" section.

In the first field, type a commit message. The commit message should briefly tell contributors about the changes you are introducing to the file.

Rules to live by for commit messages:

  • Don’t end your commit message with a period.
  • Keep your commit messages to 50 characters or less. Add extra detail in the extended description window if necessary. This is located just below the subject line.
  • Use active voice. For example, "add" instead of "added" and "merge" instead of "merged".
  • Think of your commit as expressing intent to introduce a change.

<hr> </details>

:keyboard: Activity: Your first commit

The following steps will guide you through the process of committing a change on GitHub.

  1. Create a new file on this branch, in a _posts folder called 0000-01-02-Bakedpeddler100.md. You can do so using this shortcut or manually as follows:
    • Return to the "Code" tab
    • In the branch drop-down, select "my-slide"
    • Click Create new file
    • In the "file name" field, type _posts/0000-01-02-Bakedpeddler100.md. Entering the / in the filename will automatically place your file in the _posts directory.
  2. When you’re done naming the file, add the following content to your file:
    ---
    layout: slide
    title: "Welcome to our second slide!"
    ---
    Your text
    Use the left arrow to go back!
    
  3. After adding the text, you can commit the change by entering a commit message in the text-entry field below the file edit view. For guidelines on commit messages, check out the Commits 101 drop-down, just above these instructions
  4. When you’ve entered a commit message, click Commit new file

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect a new commit on this branch.</h3>

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Getting Started with GitHub

Consider this issue finished! :white_check_mark:

<hr> <h3 align="center">Head over to <a href="https://github.com/Bakedpeddler100/github-slideshow/issues/2">the next issue</a> now!</h3>

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Your first contribution

Step 4: Create a branch

Let’s complete the first step of the GitHub flow: creating a branch <sup>:book:</sup>.

<details><summary>Creating a branch</summary>

Creating a branch

:tv: Video: Branches

You just learned how to create a branch—the first step in the GitHub flow.

Branches are an important part of the GitHub flow because they allow us to separate our work from the main branch. In other words, everyone's work is safe while you contribute.

Tips for using branches

A single project can have hundreds of branches, each suggesting a new change to the main branch.

The best way to keep branches organized with a team is to keep them concise and short-lived. In other words, a single branch should represent a single new feature or bug fix. This reduces confusion among contributors when branches are only active for a few days before they’re merged <sup>:book:</sup> into the main branch.

<hr> </details>

:keyboard: Activity: Your first branch

  1. Navigate to the Code tab
  2. Click Branch: main in the drop-down
  3. In the field, enter a name for your branch, like my-slide
  4. Click Create branch: <name> or press the <kbd>Enter</kbd> key to create your branch

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect a new branch has been created in this repository.</h3>

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue openedBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Your first contribution

Introduction to GitHub flow

Now that you're familiar with issues, let's use this issue to track your path to your first contribution.

People use different workflows to contribute to software projects, but the simplest and most effective way to contribute on GitHub is the GitHub flow.

:tv: Video: Understanding the GitHub flow

<hr> <h3 align="center">Read below for next steps</h3>

created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Getting Started with GitHub

Step 3: Close an issue

You turned on GitHub Pages!

Your site is now visible to the public. Check it out at https://bakedpeddler100.github.io/github-slideshow/.

Now that you’ve completed the tasks in this issue, it's time to close it! Closing an issue tells other contributors that this particular conversation or task has come to an end.

:keyboard: Activity

  1. Click the Close issue button below

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when you've closed this issue.</h3>

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Getting Started with GitHub

Step 2: Turn on GitHub Pages

:tada: You're now the proud manager of this issue! Now that you've assigned yourself, people who drop by know that they're welcome to participate, but you'll be carrying this issue across the finish line. :sunglasses:.

Let's use GitHub Pages

Now, on to business! GitHub Pages allow you to serve a static site from a repository. We've filled this repository with some site content, but the rendered site isn't visible right now. Let's change that.

:keyboard: Activity: Enable GitHub Pages

  1. Click on the Settings tab in this repository
  2. Scroll down to the "GitHub Pages" section
  3. From the "Source" drop down, select main branch

Note: Even though you'll see an option to choose a theme, do not apply a theme at this point. We've protected the code so you can't make unintended changes. You'll have the opportunity to apply a theme when the course is completed.

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond in this issue when I detect GitHub Pages has deployed your site.</h3>

Turning on GitHub Pages creates a deployment of your repository. I may take up to a minute to respond as I await the deployment.

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Getting Started with GitHub

Step 1: Assign yourself

Unassigned issues don't have owners to look after them. When you’re assigned to an issue or pull request, it tells repository visitors and contributors that you'll be facilitating the conversation or task :muscle:.

:keyboard: Activity

  1. On the right side of the screen, under the "Assignees" section, click the gear icon and select yourself

For a printable version of the steps in this course, check out the Quick Reference Guide.

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect you've assigned yourself to this issue.</h3>

Sometimes I respond too fast for the page to update! If you perform an expected action and don't see a response from me, wait a few seconds and refresh the page for your next steps.

github-learning-lab[bot]

comment created time in a month

issue openedBakedpeddler100/github-slideshow

Getting Started with GitHub

:wave: Welcome to GitHub Learning Lab's "Introduction to GitHub"

To get started, I’ll guide you through some important first steps in coding and collaborating on GitHub.

:point_down: This arrow means you can expand the window! Click on them throughout the course to find more information. <details><summary>What is GitHub?</summary> <hr>

What is GitHub?

I'm glad you asked! Many people come to GitHub because they want to contribute to open source <sup>:book:</sup> projects, or they're invited by teammates or classmates who use it for their projects. Why do people use GitHub for these projects?

At its heart, GitHub is a collaboration platform.

From software to legal documents, you can count on GitHub to help you do your best work with the collaboration and security tools your team needs. With GitHub, you can keep projects completely private, invite the world to collaborate, and streamline every step of your project.

GitHub is also a powerful version control tool.

GitHub uses Git <sup>:book:</sup>, the most popular open source version control software, to track every contribution and contributor <sup>:book:</sup> to your project--so you know exactly where every line of code came from.

GitHub helps people do much more.

GitHub is used to build some of the most advanced technologies in the world. Whether you're visualizing data or building a new game, there's a whole community and set of tools on GitHub that can get you to the next step. This course starts with the basics, but we'll dig into the rest later!

:tv: Video: What is GitHub? <hr> </details><br>

<details><summary>Exploring a GitHub repository</summary> <hr>

Exploring a GitHub repository

:tv: Video: Exploring a repository

More features

The video covered some of the most commonly-used features. Here are a few other items you can find in GitHub repositories:

  • Project boards: Create Kanban-style task tracking board within GitHub
  • Wiki: Create and store relevant project documentation
  • Insights: View a drop-down menu that contains links to analytics tools for your repository including:
    • Pulse: Find information about the work that has been completed and the work that’s in-progress in this project dashboard
    • Graphs: Graphs provide a more granular view of the repository activity including who contributed to the repository, who forked it, and when they completed the work

Special Files

In the video you learned about a special file called the README.md. Here are a few other special files you can add to your repositories:

  • CONTRIBUTING.md: The CONTRIBUTING.md is used to describe the process for contributing to the repository. A link to the CONTRIBUTING.md file is shown anytime someone creates a new issue or pull request.
  • ISSUE_TEMPLATE.md: The ISSUE_TEMPLATE.md is another file you can use to pre-populate the body of an issue. For example, if you always need the same types of information for bug reports, include it in the issue template, and every new issue will be opened with your recommended starter text.

<hr> </details>

Using issues

This is an issue <sup>:book:</sup>: a place where you can have conversations about bugs in your code, code review, and just about anything else.

Issue titles are like email subject lines. They tell your collaborators what the issue is about at a glance. For example, the title of this issue is Getting Started with GitHub.

<details><summary>Using GitHub Issues</summary>

Using GitHub issues

Issues are used to discuss ideas, enhancements, tasks, and bugs. They make collaboration easier by:

  • Providing everyone (even future team members) with the complete story in one place
  • Allowing you to cross-link to other issues and pull requests <sup>:book:</sup>
  • Creating a single, comprehensive record of how and why you made certain decisions
  • Allowing you to easily pull the right people and teams into a conversation with @-mentions

:tv: Video: Using issues

<hr> </details>

<details><summary>Managing notifications</summary> <hr>

Managing notifications

:tv: Video: Watching, notifications, stars, and explore

Once you've commented on an issue or pull request, you'll start receiving email notifications when there's activity in the thread.

How to silence or unmute specific conversations

  1. Go to the issue or pull request
  2. Under "Notifications", click the Unsubscribe button on the right to silence notifications or Subscribe to unmute them

You'll see a short description that explains your current notification status.

How to customize notifications in Settings

  1. Click your profile icon
  2. Click Settings
  3. Click Notifications from the menu on the left and adjust your notification preferences

Repository notification options

  • Watch: You'll receive a notification when a new issue, pull request or comment is posted, and when an issue is closed or a pull request is merged
  • Not watching: You'll no longer receive notifications unless you're @-mentioned
  • Ignore: You'll no longer receive any notifications from the repository

How to review notifications for the repositories you're watching

  1. Click your profile icon
  2. Click Settings
  3. Click Notification from the menu on the left
  4. Click on the things you’re watching link
  5. Select the Watching tab
  6. Click the Unwatch button to disable notifications, or Watch to enable them

<hr> </details>

<hr> <h3 align="center">Keep reading below to find your first task</h3>

created time in a month

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Create Dockerfile

<hr> <h3 align="center">Great work merging your pull request! I created a <a href="https://github.com/Bakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions/issues/3">new issue</a>, look for my final response there.</h3>

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

issue openedBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Congratulations

Nice work!

celebrate

You've created your first GitHub Action and this course is now complete! I'll stop responding but the fun doesn't have to stop here.

Want to keep learning?

<!-- Continue learning about actions by taking the next course in the GitHub Actions Learning Path -->

In this repository:

  • Your merge should trigger your action again, check it out in the Actions tab.
  • The Dockerfile contains metadata for your action. Try changing some of that. You could, for example, change the icon that displays when the action is running.
  • Change the MY_NAME environment variable to use your name instead of Mona's in .github/workflows/main.yml.
  • Change the contents of entrypoint.sh to output a different message.

Outside of this repository:

Now...what will you learn next?

created time in a month

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Create Dockerfile

Nice, you just added an action block to your workflow file! Here are some important details about why each part of the block exists and what each part does.

  • jobs: is the base component of a workflow run
  • build: is the identifier we're attaching to this job
  • name: is the name of the job, this is displayed on GitHub when the workflow is running
  • runs-on: defines the type of machine to run the job on. The machine can be either a GitHub-hosted runner or a self-hosted runner.
  • steps: the linear sequence of operations that make up a job
  • uses: actions/checkout@v1 uses a community action called checkout to allow the workflow to access the contents of the repository
  • uses: ./action-a provides the relative path to the action we created in the action-a directory of the repository
  • with: is used to specify the input variables that will be available to your action in the runtime environment. In this case, the input variable is MY_NAME, and it is currently initialized to "Mona".

Your action has been triggered!

Your repository now contains an action (defined in the /action-a/ folder) and a workflow (defined in the ./github/workflows/main.yml file).

This action will run any time a new commit is created or pushed to the remote repository. Since you just created a commit, the workflow should have been triggered. This might take a few minutes since it's the first time running in this repository.

Seeing your Action in action

The status of your action is shown here in the pull request (look for All checks have passed below), or you can click the "Actions" tab in your repository. From there you will see the actions that have run, and you can click on the action's "Log" link to view details.

View an action's log

Step 6: Trigger the workflow

:keyboard: Activity: See your action trigger the workflow

You've done the work, now sit back and see your action trigger the workflow!

<hr> <h3 align="center">I will respond when I detect your action has run and reported a status.</h3>

Actions can take a minute or two to run. Sometimes, I also respond too fast for the page to update! If you don't see a response from your action, wait a few seconds and refresh the page.

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Create Dockerfile

Nice work! :tada: You added a workflow!

Here's what it means:

  • name: A workflow for my Hello World file gives your workflow a name. This name appears on any pull request or in the Actions tab. The name is especially useful when there are multiple workflows in your repository.
  • on: push indicates that your workflow will execute anytime code is pushed to your repository, using the push event.

Next, we need to specify a job or jobs to run.

Actions

Workflows piece together jobs, and jobs piece together steps. We'll now create a job that runs an action. Actions can be used from within the same repository, from any other public repository, or from a published Docker container image. We'll use an action that we'll define in this repository.

We'll add the block now, and break it down in the next step.

Step 5: Run an action from your workflow file

Let's add the expected action to the workflow.

:keyboard: Activity: Add an action block to your workflow file

  1. As a part of this branch and pull request, edit .github/workflows/main.yml to append the following content:
    jobs:
      build:
        name: Hello world action
        runs-on: ubuntu-latest
        steps:
          - uses: actions/checkout@v1
          - uses: ./action-a
            with:
              MY_NAME: "Mona"
    
  2. Click Start commit in the top right of the workflow editor
  3. Type your commit message and commit your changes directly to your branch

<details><summary>Trouble pushing?</summary>

The main.yml file cannot be edited using an integration. Try editing the file using the web interface, or your command line.

It is possible that you are using an integration (like GitHub Desktop or any other tool that authenticates as you and pushes on your behalf) if you receive a message like the one below:

To https://github.com/your-username/your-repo.git
 ! [remote rejected] your-branch -> your-branch (refusing to allow an integration to update main.yml)
error: failed to push some refs to 'https://github.com/your-username/your-repo.git'

</details> <br />

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect a new commit on this branch.</h3>

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Create Dockerfile

Next, we'll define a workflow that uses the GitHub Action.

Workflow Files

Workflows are defined in special files in the .github/workflows directory, named main.yml.

Workflows can execute based on your chosen event. For this lab, we'll be using the push event.

We'll break down each line of the workflow in the next step.

Step 4: Start your workflow file

First, we'll add the structure of the workflow.

:keyboard: Activity: Name and trigger your workflow

  1. Create a file titled .github/workflows/main.yml. You can do so using this quicklink or manually:
    • As a part of this branch and pull request, create a workflows directory nested inside the .github directory.
    • In the new .github/workflows/ directory, create a file titled main.yml
  2. Add the following content to the main.yml file:
    name: A workflow for my Hello World file
    on: push
    
  3. Stage and commit the changes
  4. Push the changes to GitHub

<details><summary>Trouble pushing? Click here.</summary>

The main.yml file cannot be edited using an integration. Try editing the file using the web interface, or your command line.

It is possible that you are using an integration (like GitHub Desktop or any other tool that authenticates as you and pushes on your behalf) if you receive a message like the one below:

To https://github.com/your-username/your-repo.git
 ! [remote rejected] your-branch -> your-branch (refusing to allow an integration to update main.yml)
error: failed to push some refs to 'https://github.com/your-username/your-repo.git'

</details> <br />

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect a new commit on this branch.</h3>

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Create Dockerfile

Nice work adding the entrypoint.sh script.

In entrypoint.sh, all we're doing is outputting a "Hello world" message using an environment variable called MY_NAME.

Next, we'll define the action.yml file which contains the metadata for our action.

action.yml

All actions require a metadata file that uses YAML syntax. The data in the metadata file defines the inputs, outputs and main entrypoint for your action.

Step 3: Add an action metadata file

We will use an input parameter to read in the value of MY_NAME.

:keyboard: Activity: Create action.yml

  1. As a part of this branch and pull request, create a file titled action-a/action.yml. You can do so using this quicklink or manually.

  2. Add the following content to the action.yml file:

    name: "Hello Actions"
    description: "Greet someone"
    author: "octocat@github.com"
    
    inputs:
      MY_NAME:
        description: "Who to greet"
        required: true
        default: "World"
    
    runs:
      using: "docker"
      image: "Dockerfile"
    
    branding:
      icon: "mic"
      color: "purple"
    
  3. Stage and commit the changes

  4. Push the changes to GitHub

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect a new commit on this branch.</h3>

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

issue closedBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Welcome

Welcome

This course helps you create a simple GitHub Action and use that action in a workflow.

What are GitHub Actions?

GitHub Actions are a flexible way to automate nearly every aspect of your team's software workflow. Here are just a few of the ways teams are using GitHub Actions:

  • Automated testing (CI)
  • Continuous delivery and deployment
  • Responding to workflow triggers using issues, @ mentions, labels, and more
  • Triggering code reviews
  • Managing branches
  • Triaging issues and pull requests

The sky is truly the limit with GitHub Actions.

The best part, these workflows are stored as code in your repository and easily shared and reused across teams.

To learn even more, check out the GitHub Actions feature page, or the GitHub Actions documentation.

Before you begin

In this course you will work with issues and pull requests, as well as edit files. If these things are not familiar to you, we recommend you take the Introduction to GitHub course, first!

closed time in a month

github-learning-lab[bot]

pull request commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Create Dockerfile

Nice work, you committed a Dockerfile. You'll notice at the end of the Dockerfile, we refer to an entrypoint script.

ENTRYPOINT ["/entrypoint.sh"]

The entrypoint.sh script will be run in Docker, and it will define what the action is really going to be doing.

Step 2: Add an entrypoint script

An entrypoint script must exist in our repository so that Docker has something to execute.

:keyboard: Activity: Add an entrypoint script and commit it to your branch

  1. As a part of this branch and pull request, create a file in the /action-a/ directory titled entrypoint.sh. You can do so with this quicklink

  2. Add the following content to the entrypoint.sh file:

    #!/bin/sh -l
    
    sh -c "echo Hello world my name is $INPUT_MY_NAME"
    
  3. Stage and commit the changes

  4. Push the changes to GitHub

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond when I detect a new commit on this branch.</h3>

Bakedpeddler100

comment created time in a month

issue commentBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Welcome

Actions and Workflows

There are two components to using GitHub Actions that we'll cover:

  • the action itself
  • a workflow that uses action(s)

A workflow can contain many actions. Each action has its own purpose. We'll put the files relating to the action in their own directories.

Types of Actions

Actions come in two types: container actions and JavaScript actions.

Docker container actions allow the environment to be packaged with the GitHub Actions code and can only execute in the GitHub-Hosted Linux environment.

JavaScript actions decouple the GitHub Actions code from the environment allowing faster execution but accepting greater dependency management responsibility.

<!-- UNCOMMENT WHEN THESE TWO COURSE GO LIVE AND ADD PROPER LINK DETAILS 📖 To learn more about creating each type of action, refer to the related learning lab course:

Step 1: Add a Dockerfile

Our action will use a Docker container so it will require a Dockerfile. Let's add it now. We won't discuss what each line means in detail, but the important thing to know is that the action will be executed in an environment defined by this file.

:keyboard: Activity: Create a Dockerfile and open a pull request

  1. Create a file titled action-a/Dockerfile by using this quick link or manually:

    • Create a new branch. Branches should be named intentionally, so a good name for this branch could be first-action.
    • On the new branch, create a directory: action-a. Note: If you're working on GitHub.com, you can create a directory and a file at the same time by naming the file action-a/Dockerfile.
    • In the action-a directory, create a file titled Dockerfile.
  2. Fill the Dockerfile with the content below:

    FROM debian:9.5-slim
    
    ADD entrypoint.sh /entrypoint.sh
    RUN chmod +x /entrypoint.sh
    ENTRYPOINT ["/entrypoint.sh"]
    
  3. Commit your file

    • If you're working locally, you will also need stage your file and to push the branch to GitHub.
  4. Open a pull request with your new branch against main

<hr> <h3 align="center">I'll respond in your new pull request with next steps.</h3>

github-learning-lab[bot]

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issue openedBakedpeddler100/hello-github-actions

Welcome

Welcome

This course helps you create a simple GitHub Action and use that action in a workflow.

What are GitHub Actions?

GitHub Actions are a flexible way to automate nearly every aspect of your team's software workflow. Here are just a few of the ways teams are using GitHub Actions:

  • Automated testing (CI)
  • Continuous delivery and deployment
  • Responding to workflow triggers using issues, @ mentions, labels, and more
  • Triggering code reviews
  • Managing branches
  • Triaging issues and pull requests

The sky is truly the limit with GitHub Actions.

The best part, these workflows are stored as code in your repository and easily shared and reused across teams.

To learn even more, check out the GitHub Actions feature page, or the GitHub Actions documentation.

Before you begin

In this course you will work with issues and pull requests, as well as edit files. If these things are not familiar to you, we recommend you take the Introduction to GitHub course, first!

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